0

It’s always fun to daydream about what life as a nurse practitioner would be like if you lived in a different region of the United States. What would it be like if you had to trek through a foot of snow to get to work each day? Or maybe you’re more of a beach person and are daydreaming of spending your days off soaking up the sun with the sea breeze blowing in your hair. Money is certainly a big motivating factor for actually picking up and moving to a new state. You certainly don’t want to move somewhere that doesn’t pay its NPs very well. That said, while a state may be top paying, other factors like cost of living and state taxes are things you’ll definitely want to take into further consideration. 

Each year the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics collects salary information for various professions and publishes data for the prior year. While the 2019 NP stats aren’t available quite yet, the 2018 stats are! Keep in mind that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data looks at average pay. So, it is possible to earn more or less in these and other states depending on the specifics of the job. 

Because other factors like the cost of living, the number of employed NPs in these states, and whether or not there are state income taxes are so pertinent, we’ve included these stats to give you a better picture of the numbers. While some of these states you might expect to find on the top-paying list, like California and New York, others were very surprising given the other contributing statistics. 

Without further ado, here are the ten highest paying states for NPs.

 

 

1. California

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $64.32

Annual Mean Wage: $133,780

 

Cost of Living: 151.7% 

Number of employed NPs: 13,420

State income tax: 1% – 13.3%, the highest rate applying to incomes over $1 million

 

 

2. Alaska

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $59.08

Annual Mean Wage: $122,880

 

Cost of Living: 129.9% 

Number of employed NPs: 440

No state income tax

 

 

3. Massachusetts

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $59.01

Annual Mean Wage: $122,740

 

Cost of Living: 131.6% 

Number of employed NPs: 6,200

State income tax: Flat rate of 5.05%

 

 

4. New Jersey

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $58.70

Annual Mean Wage: $122,100

 

Cost of Living: 125.1% 

Number of employed NPs: 5,900

State income tax: 1.4% – 10.75%, highest rate applies to incomes over $5 million

 

 

5. New York

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $58.16

Annual Mean Wage: $120,970

 

Cost of Living: 139.1% 

Number of Employed NPs: 13,710

State income tax: 1.4% – 10.75%, highest rate applies to incomes over $1,077,550

 

 

6. Hawaii

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $57.96

Annual Mean Wage: $120,570

 

Cost of Living: 192.9% 

Number of Employed NPs: 410

State income tax: 1.4% to 11%, highest rate applies to incomes over $200K

 

 

7. Minnesota

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $57.29

Annual Mean Wage: $119,160

 

Cost of Living: 101.6% 

Number of Employed NPs: 3,880

State income tax: 5.35% to 9.85%, highest rate applies to incomes over $163,890 

 

 

8. Connecticut

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $56.74

Annual Mean Wage: $118,020

 

Cost of Living: 127.7%

Number of Employed NPs: 2,340

State income tax: 3% to 6.99%, highest rate applies to incomes over $500,000

 

 

9. Washington 

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $56.56

Annual Mean Wage: $117,650

 

Cost of Living: 110.7%

Number of Employed NPs: 3,430

No state income tax

 

 

10. Wyoming

 

Mean Hourly Wage: $55.78

Annual Mean Wage: $116,030

 

Cost of Living: 89.3%

Number of Employed NPs: 290

No state income tax

 

 

Sources:

http://worldpopulationreview.com/states/states-with-lowest-cost-of-living/

https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291171.htm#(2) 

https://www.thebalance.com/state-income-tax-rates-3193320

Are you ready to Thrive?

Support + education for early career nurse practitioners.

Learn More
clipboard

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>